Work for Water

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BROWSE

Environmental Engineer

Average Salary: $74,020

Environmental engineers try to protect a natural ecosystem from damage caused by human-made projects. An ecosystem is a community of plants and animals that depend on each other to live. The ecosystem of a stream may be damaged by bulldozers, for instance, while building a pipeline. Federal and state laws require that all new construction try to limit damage to natural ecosystem. Thus, environmental engineers conduct studies relating to:

  • how a construction project will affect a watershed’s ecosystems and pollution levels;
  • how hazardous materials will be handled on a site and where they will be located;
  • how hazardous and solid waste will be collected and disposed of;
  • how to proceed with projects with the least amount of damage to an ecosystem;
  • how to replace, repair, or provide equal space in another spot for a disturbed ecosystem, a process called mitigation.

Education: Four- or five-year degree or graduate degree in civil engineering, environmental engineering, geography, urban planning. (Environmental engineering may be part of a civil engineering program or an independent discipline.)
Entry-level opportunities: Yes, with appropriate specialized education
Certificates, licenses: Licensed Professional Engineer (P.E.)
Desirable traits and skills: Strong in science and math; analytical; good written and communication skills; independently motivated

For more information:
American Academy of Environmental Engineers
130 Holiday Court, Suite 100
Annapolis, MD 21401
http://aaee.net/